Local Farms Craft Sustainable Business – Huffington Post

Untitled1“Local”, “Organic”, and “Fair-Trade USA” are sought after products for many shoppers today. These labels are a non-negotiable staple when given the choice. The artisan, farm-to-table spirit has deep roots in the Pacific Northwest and is now proudly seen in Seattle’s-own distillery market. Home to 27 micro distilleries, Seattle is the fastest growing player in America.

Craft distillery locations increased in 2008 after the Washington State Legislature passed its original craft distillery law. Post prohibition the new law gave small distilleries the opportunity to sell their products and offer free half-ounce tastings on-site.

Dr. Jones’ research is directed towards small and midsized farms of western Washington. The goal of the western Washington breeding program is to ensure the long-term environmental and economic health of farming in Washington state while producing a food crop that is safe and high in nutritional value.

In the Fremont area of Seattle, Mike Sherlock and Patti Bishop, owners of Mischief Distillery are delighting customers with their versions of fine whiskey, vodka and gin. They have been distilling and sharing creations with their community for over 20 years. Their company builds awareness and educates visitors on the importance of the farmer and brewer relationships in Washington State.

Fremont Mischief partners with neighboring farms in King and Island Counties to ensure local ingredients are used to produce their specialty whiskey, gin and vodka spirits.

Whiskey and Meat Pairing

whiskey meet splash squareBrought to you by Fremont Mischief Distillery and Bavarian Meats

Bavarian Meats is a third-generation, family-run German delicatessen and charcuterie operated out of Seattle, Washington. Founder Max Hofstatter came to America in 1933 from Munich, Germany at age 19. Upon arriving in Seattle, Max worked as a sausage maker with plans to one day make his own. After years of refining his craft, Max’s dream became a reality. With the high-quality, traditional sausage recipes brought over with him from Germany, Max founded Bavarian Meats in 1961 in time to make his grand debut at the 1962 World’s Fair. His authentic German sausages were an incredible hit and have remained a popular Seattle staple ever since. Years later, Max passed his business down to his sons Jerry and Bob. Today, Jerry’s twin daughters Lynn and Lyla run the family business located across from Pike Place Market. Bavarian Meats prides itself on its traditional techniques and authentic flavors true to the Old Country.

Today, we at Fremont Mischief and Bavarian Meats have partnered together to collaborate on creating some meats that include our spirits as ingredients. Bavarian Meats has developed recipes for landjaegers, pepperoni, and salami that feature our whiskies, vodkas, and gin. We are so excited to work with another artisan business in the Seattle area so we can provide you with more products that are as unique as they are delicious. We will be featuring a new meat and spirit paring in our tasting room as well as meats for sale so you can take them home and create your own pairings at home!

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John Jacob Rye Whiskey  |  Mischief Whiskey Maple Pepper Landjaeger

Aged for 2 years. 1 year in new American Oak, 1 year in one time use bourbon barrels. Tasting notes: roasted pecans, vanilla, and honey.

Traditional landjaeger base of blended beef and pork. Fermented, smoked, and dry cured. Black pepper, maple granules, and Fremont Mischief Whiskey.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text]

Dark Northern Rye Whiskey  |  Sherry Pepper Salami

Aged for 4 years in new American Oak. Tasting notes: Earthy, woodsy with toffee flavor.

Cervelat salami: pork and beef, fermented and dry cured. Blended with sherry, crushed red pepper flakes, and fennel.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text]

Fremont Mischief Whiskey | Worker’s No. 9 Vodka Pepperoni

Aged for 8 years in one-time use bourbon barrels. Tasting notes: campfire, burnt marshmallow, caramel, and toffee.

Traditional pepperoni recipe made with a blend of beef and pork. Worker’s No. 9 Vodka fused with ground fennel, black pepper, cayenne pepper, and finely ground crushed red pepper flakes.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Barreling Day

image3 It’s Barreling Day here at Fremont Mischief. What does that mean?
Today our young whiskey (AKA “white dog”) moves onto its next phase in life – the aging process, where this clear spirit finds a new dark and cozy home in a beautifully charred new American Oak barrel.image2
People find their true personalities over time, a product of our nature and our surroundings. Same goes for whiskey. While each barrel is created in the same way, each is one of a kind.
Today we barrel up our Dark Northern Rye Whiskey. It’s our latest edition here at Fremont Mischief and it is mighty good. Just ask us – we all agree!
Each barrel is tended to like crops on a farm, being monitored for flavor and picked for bottling at just the right time. Dark Northern is single cask bottled – slight variations from barrel to barrel mean that each bottle is unique and singularly amazing in its own way.

 

 

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Dark Northern Reserve Whiskey

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1943″ img_size=”large”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Voted Best Washington Craft Rye Whiskey in a blind taste taste with Edible Seattle Magazine, and awarded a gold medal by the American Distilling Institute.

Grain Bill:

80% Dark Northern Rye, 20% Skagit barley malt

Tasting Notes:

The Dark Northern Reserve is incredibly complex, carrying across the palate easily with its smoothness, but leaving you with a warm whiskey bite. It’s a rich spirit with a prominent raisin and honey character that leads to a mellow smoky, spice finish.

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Dark Northern Whiskey

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”2279″ img_size=”large”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Dark Northern dominates the palate upfront with a fresh woodsy taste before mellowing out into a lingering smoky, toffee finish. It’s hand crafted in Fremont with only the finest local rye, and barley malt from Skagit Valley.

Grain Bill:

80% Dark Northern Rye, 20% Skagit barley malt

Tasting Notes:

Peaty, oaky, woodsy, subtle earthiness, delicate smokiness, subtle roasted/spiciness, smooth and sweet finish

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Dark Northern

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text]new dark northern for product[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]First introduced to the Pacific Northwest by Scandinavian settlers in the mid 1800’s, Dark Northern Rye has been a favorite with the locals ever since. Now, we’re ready to share it with the world.

Tasting Notes:

  • Peaty, Oaky, Woodsy
  • subtle earthiness,
  • Delicate smokiness
  • Subtle roasted/spiciness
  • Smooth and sweet finish

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Dark Northern Reserve

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_column_text]Dark Northern Reserve Solo[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]First introduced to the Pacific Northwest by Scandinavian settlers in the mid 1800’s, Dark Northern Rye has been a favorite with the locals ever since. Now, we’re ready to share it with the world.

Tasting Notes:

  • Peaty, Oaky, Woodsy
  • subtle earthiness,
  • Delicate smokiness
  • Subtle roasted/spiciness
  • Smooth and sweet finish

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Fremont Mischief Apple Brandy and KuKuRuZa Popcorn

Fremont Mischief is pleased to announce its latest collaboration with Seattle-based artisanal popcorn company KuKuRuZa. Warm up your winter palate with this tasty Seasonal Specialty Eggnog Brandy popcorn, featuring our apple brandy.
The popcorn starts with Classic Caramel infused with nutmeg and eggnog then drizzled with melted chocolate, and the piece de resistance – a light layer of Fremont Mischief apple brandy.
One word: yummy.

popcorn

 

Fremont: Quirky, lively and very popular

The old neighborhood under the Aurora Bridge has undergone dramatic change, but retains much of the quirky character that has made it such a magnet over the years.

Seattle TimesBy Stacey Solie | Special to The Seattle Times | May 17, 2013

With hugely popular seasonal festivals, a high concentration of live-music venues, an abundance of Thai restaurants rivaled only by an abundance of bicycle shops, Fremont is firmly established as a destination place to play in Seattle.

And, as companies such as Adobe Systems, Getty Images and Google have taken up occupancy in the low-slung office complex along the Lake Washington Ship Canal, Fremont is also clearly where people go to work.

Fremont’s residential community is growing, too, with many new condos, town houses and apartments going up in recent years, replacing older single-family houses.

More new housing developments are on the way — a 138-unit project on Stone Way North near North 36th Street and a 172-unit complex nearby on Woodland Park Avenue North.

In the meantime, existing residents mix with the work-hard, play-hard crowds which, on any given night, are out partaking of the neighborhood’s lively entertainments.

From taking in a live performance to imbibing locally brewed beer (Fremont Brewing) or spirits (Fremont Mischief Distillery) or gorging on locally roasted organic chocolate (Theo Chocolate), there’s no shortage of options in Fremont.

“I really appreciate the walkability,” says Karen Woodburn, 29, who moved to Fremont from Wallingford about three years ago.

Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times
Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times
Fremont’s “Center of the Universe” sign, on North 36th Street between Evanston Avenue North and Fremont Place North, points to many of the neighborhood’s colorful landmarks, historical buildings and local flavor.

A student at Bastyr, after class on Fridays she heads to Fremont’s Thrive Healing Massage for a rubdown and then meets her husband for a cocktail at Quoin. Sometimes they follow up with a game of Super Mario Brothers at the Add-a-Ball underground arcade across the street.

Josh Woodburn, a 31-year-old bioengineering graduate student at the University of Washington, likes that after a night out in the bustling lower Fremont area, the couple can wander up the hill to their one-bedroom duplex, which they rent for the under-market rate of $815 a month in upper Fremont.

“The weekends can be randy,” Woodburn said. “Especially in the summer, it gets crazy.”

Home values in Fremont have jumped over the past year, as they have throughout the Seattle area, according to figures compiled by Seattle-based Zillow.com.

The median value of all single-family houses in Fremont, not just those that recently sold, was $495,500 in March, up 10.8 percent year-over-year, the Zillow Home Value Index shows.

The median value of condos in Fremont was $347,700 in March, up 14 percent year-over-year, and the median apartment rent was $1,766, up 3.5 percent year-over-year, according to Zillow.

The Fremont neighborhood is considered “very walkable” (meaning most errands can be accomplished on foot) and got a rating of 86 (out of 100) from Walk Score, a Seattle company that provides automated walkability ratings.

Fremont does not try to keep itself secret. The Chamber of Commerce puts out a free map and brochure for tourists, and the area’s past is immortalized in the History House museum.

Its sidewalks are dotted with historical markers for self-guided tours, or, for a more interactive experience, a costumed street-theater crew leads group tours.

These, along with zany events, including the Solstice Parade, coming up in June, featuring belly dancers and naked cyclists, and Moisture Fest, with burlesque and aerial performances, lends this little pocket of North Seattle a manic pixie theme-park festivity.

Situated between Ballard and Wallingford, and connected by the Burke-Gilman Trail, Fremont is also a neighborhood that proudly flaunts its many displays of public quirk. These include a pair of topiary apatosauruses lingering off Phinney Avenue; a larger than life-size bronze homage to Vladimir Lenin, the Bolshevik totalitarian dictator, who seems to be perpetually striding away from an Italian gelateria behind him; a mounted silver Cold War-era rocket pointed into the sky, as if ready for takeoff; and a one-eyed VW-grabbing troll under the Aurora Bridge.

Fremont’s current incarnation is a far cry from its scruffier days in the 1960s, back when Brian Regan began frequenting the area.

A teenager at the time, Regan recalled squatting in a room on the second floor of what was then the Fremont Hotel, a historic building on Fremont Avenue North. There, he did not pay rent, he said, and he doubted that anyone else did either.

“You could live a sort of openly illegal life,” Regan said.

Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times  Kayakers head toward the Fremont Bridge, while the Aurora Bridge looms above it.
Ellen M. Banner / The Seattle Times
Kayakers head toward the Fremont Bridge, while the Aurora Bridge looms above it.

That was a different Fremont entirely. Some of the buildings were boarded up and abandoned, partially a result of the 1932 completion of the Aurora Bridge (officially the George Washington Memorial Bridge), which dwarfs the Fremont Bridge and allows traffic to zoom past Fremont altogether.

Additionally, “the end of interurban rail service in 1939 and trolley service in 1941 sent the neighborhood into eclipse,” says the neighborhood’s story at HistoryLink.org.

This decades-long period of neglect also created affordable space for artists to move into the neighborhood, Regan said, beginning the area’s transformation into an arts and business hub for the city.

As the neighborhood began to transform, so did Regan, who, after spending his youth on the other side of the law, had an epiphany, earned a business degree from the University of Washington and became a developer.

His most recent project is the newly constructed Saturn Building, a five-story office building at North 35th Street and Evanston Avenue North, anchored by the upscale Wine Tea Chocolate cafe.

Today, rent-free living in Fremont is nearly impossible to fathom. At the Epicenter, a six-story apartment complex whose exterior is adorned with whimsical curlicue metal sculptures, studios begin at $1,250, one bedrooms go for $1,550 and two-bedrooms for $1,950, said Lydia Anderson, a leasing agent for the building.

Perched above the PCC Natural Market, the complex has few vacancies, she said.

Anderson, a writer and a copy editor, moved to the Epicenter from Redmond a year ago and says she enjoys the car-free lifestyle, where she can walk to Peet’s Coffee to get her writing done.

When Pete Hanning first moved to Fremont, in the 1990s, it still had a lot of rough edges.

“It was a lot grittier, then. A lot more blue-collar,” said Hanning, co-owner of the Red Door Saloon.

The area was popular with motorcyclists, and it attracted one of the largest AA meetings in the Northwest, he said.

Since then, Hanning stepped up from bartender to co-owner of the Red Door. He met the woman he would later marry, Emily Hanning, in Fremont, and the couple recently purchased a house adjacent to the Hazel Heights P-Patch at 42nd and Baker -— a community garden named in honor of the previous owner of his home, the late Hazel Hurlburt. Hanning’s house harbors one of two cisterns that collect rainwater for the garden.

Civic engagement is a strength of the neighborhood, Hanning said.

The social-services group Solid Ground was founded there.

Hanning recounted that, at a fall 2012 election debate between state Democratic Speaker of the House Frank Chopp and socialist candidate Kshama Sawant: “The tension was between the Democrat and the Socialist, and the Democrats were being pushed like they were far to the right,” he said, adding, “We are in Fremont.”

A central figure in Fremont’s cultural, political and business realm is developer Suzie Burke.

In the residential market, Burke said Fremont’s vacancy rate is typically low. “We have infill from folks going to the University of Washington, and SPU (Seattle Pacific University). They come and go. It lubricates our apartment market.”

“As far as houses go, Fremont fits right into the same boat as most of the rest of Seattle. There aren’t very many for sale,” Burke said.

Burke anticipates that the completion of a currently under-construction property she owns, at 3400 Stone Way N., may bring new residents to the area.

So could the running-shoe and athletic-gear manufacturing company Brooks Sports, when it moves there later this year from Bothell.

Arguably Fremont’s No. 1 promoter, Burke says Fremont has it all.

“It’s one of the only neighborhoods of Seattle where it’s actually possible to work, live, shop and totally enjoy being a Fremonster.”

 

 

See the article at Seattle Times….

Worker’s No.9 Vodka

[vc_row][vc_column width=”1/3″][vc_single_image image=”1923″ img_size=”large”][/vc_column][vc_column width=”2/3″][vc_column_text]Every time you enjoy Worker’s No 9 you support our brave fire fighters through the Washington State Council of Firefighters. Presented by KISW and Fremont Mischief Distillery.

Grain bill:

Made from just two ingredients: Washington grown soft winter wheat and pure Mt Rainier water

Tasting Notes:

Vibrant, crisp, full bodied with a rich mouth feel. Smooth, slight grain sweetness on the finish. Just enough for sipping or your favorite mixed cocktail.

 

[/vc_column_text][vc_btn title=”I WANT TO BUY SOME!” style=”custom” custom_background=”#dd971c” custom_text=”#ffffff” shape=”square” link=”url:https%3A%2F%2Ffremontmischief.com%2Fwhere-to-buy-your-mischief%2F|||”][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]Distributed by: Youngs Market Company
Here is the link 
WORKERSVODKA.COM for the latest events, information and to find the Worker’s No 9 nearest you.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

Fremont Mischief “Freedom” Whiskey

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Grain Bill:

85% Rye / 15% Malted Barley

Varietal(s):

Aged 6-7 years in Bourbon barrels. Bold notes of smoke, caramel and hazelnut

Distiller’s Notes:

Mischief’s “Freedom” Whiskey is a special packaging for our premium whiskey to honor those who have served. Each bottled has a unique dog tag with the name of a fallen or wounded soldier. The package features the always moving Gettysburg Address.

[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]Whisky Advocate Rated 88 Very Good. Plenty of Character, Worth Seeking Out, No Flaws

“Congratulations are due… rye-spice vanilla aromas, not a fiery American rye…all the spice is there and floral/grassy complexity but more rich oak notes and a high arching finish that sustains the whiskey on the palate.”

-LB, Whisky Advocate

[/vc_column_text][vc_empty_space][vc_column_text]Help ‘Carry the Lantern’.  For veterans who have served and for those still on active duty,  we present “Freedom Isn’t Free, a specially packaged bottle of our flagship Fremont Mischief Whiskey.  On every bottle you’ll find a unique dog tag honoring and thanking someone who received a Purple Heart while in service to our Country. To make your bottle even more personal, we also make dog tags by request for no additional charge.  Write us at  tastingroom@fremontmischief.com

Community is like family. We donate a portion from sales of each spirit to a deserving foundation that builds our community:  Mary’s place, Behind the Badge, Growing Veterans, and Sea Scouts.

With each bottle sold, Mischief donates to Growing Veterans. This organization empowers military veterans to connect, heal and build community through farming[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]

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